Winter Reads

While we’re off brewing up a bigger and badder book club experience for you Bad Gals, we leave you with our must-reads to get you through the winter. We’ve pulled a diverse mix of critically acclaimed Canadian fiction, comedy, short form, a poignant memoir - truly something for every reader. 

Read 010 coming soon.

now read

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longlisted for Canada Reads 2019

The Boy on the Beach

by Tima Kurdi

Alan Kurdi's body washed up on the shore of the Mediterranean Sea on Sept. 2, 2015, and overnight, the political became personal, as the world awoke to the reality of the Syrian refugee crisis. Tima Kurdi first saw the shocking photo of her nephew in her home in Vancouver. But Tima did not need a photo to understand the truth — she and her family had already been living it.

From the jasmine‑scented neighbourhoods of Damascus before the war to the streets of Aleppo during it, to the refugee camps of Europe and the leafy suburbs of Vancouver, The Boy on the Beach is one family's story of love, loss and the persistent search for safe harbour in a devastating time of war. 

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Winner of the 2018 Scotiabank Giller Prize

Washington Black

by Esi Edugyan

George Washington Black, or “Wash,” an eleven-year-old field slave on a Barbados sugar plantation, is terrified to be chosen by his master’s brother as his manservant. To his surprise, the eccentric Christopher Wilde turns out to be a naturalist, explorer, inventor, and abolitionist. Soon Wash is initiated into a world where a flying machine can carry a man across the sky, where even a boy born in chains may embrace a life of dignity and meaning–and where two people, separated by an impossible divide, can begin to see each other as human. But when a man is killed and a bounty is placed on Wash’s head, Christopher and Wash must abandon everything. What follows is their flight along the eastern coast of America, and, finally, to a remote outpost in the Arctic. What brings Christopher and Wash together will tear them apart, propelling Wash even further across the globe in search of his true self.

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dead-pan wit

My Sister, The Serial Killer

by oyinkan Braithwaite

Satire meets slasher in this short, darkly funny hand grenade of a novel about a Nigerian woman whose younger sister has a very inconvenient habit of killing her boyfriends.

Korede is bitter. How could she not be? Her sister, Ayoola, is many things: the favorite child, the beautiful one, possibly sociopathic. And now Ayoola's third boyfriend in a row is dead. Korede's practicality is the sisters' saving grace. She knows the best solutions for cleaning blood, the trunk of her car is big enough for a body, and she keeps Ayoola from posting pictures of her dinner to Instagram when she should be mourning her "missing" boyfriend. Not that she gets any credit.

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longlisted for Canada Reads 2019

That Time I Loved You

by Carrianne Leung

The suburbs of the 1970s promised to be heaven on earth—new houses, new status, happiness guaranteed. But in a Scarborough subdivision populated by newcomers from all over the world, a series of sudden catastrophic events reveals that not everyone’s dreams come true. Moving from house to house, Carrianne Leung explores the inner lives behind the tidy front gardens and picture-perfect windows, always returning to June, an irrepressible adolescent Chinese-Canadian coming of age in this shifting world.

Through June and her neighbours, Leung depicts the fine line where childhood meets the realities of adult life, and examines, with insight and sharp prose, how difficult it is to be true to ourselves at any age.

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short story

Roar

by ceclia ahern

Have you ever imagined a different life?Have you ever stood at a crossroads, undecided? Have you ever had a moment when you wanted to roar?From much-loved, international bestseller Cecelia Ahern come stories for all of us: the women who befriend us, the women who encourage us, the women who make us brave. From The Woman Who Slowly Disappeared to The Woman Who Returned and Exchanged her Husband, discover thirty touching, often hilarious, stories and meet thirty very different women. Each discovers her strength; each realizes she holds the power to make a change. Witty, tender, surprising, these keenly observed tales speak to us all, and capture the moment when we all want to roar.


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bad gal humour

The Gynesaurs

by P.H Oliver

This independently published Canadian novel delves into the lives of four women — described as “past their reproductive prime” — whose crazy, but colourful lives intersect while working in an obstetrics and gynaecology office.

As the novel reveals the challenging and often hilarious stories of each woman’s life, the reader is afforded a glimpse into what it means to celebrate the evolution of womanhood through friendship.


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a memoir

Educated

by Tara Westover

Born to survivalists in the mountains of Idaho, Tara Westover was seventeen the first time she set foot in a classroom. Her family was so isolated from mainstream society she had no birth certificate, no medical records and had never been enrolled in school. As she developed her own coping mechanisms, little by little, she started to realize that what her family was offering didn’t have to be her only education. Her quest for knowledge transformed her, taking her over oceans and across continents, to Harvard and to Cambridge University. A true universal coming-of-age story that gets to the heart of what an education is and what it offers: the perspective to see one's life through new eyes and the will to change it.

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Longlisted for the 2018 Scotiabank Giller Prize

Split Tooth

by Tanya Tagaq

From the internationally acclaimed Inuit throat singer who has dazzled and enthralled the world with music it had never heard before, a fierce, tender, heartbreaking story unlike anything you've ever read.

Split Tooth is a short mythobiography about a teenage girl living in a small Nunavut community in the 1970s who discovers her shamanic powers at the onset of puberty. Wielding words as sharp as shale rocks and ice, Tagaq narrates the story from the unnamed girl’s perspective with poems woven in between prose vignettes. Veering back and forth between the grittiest features of a small arctic town, the electrifying proximity of the world of animals, and ravishing world of myth, she explores a world where the distinctions between good and evil, animal and human, victim and transgressor, real and imagined lose their meaning, but the guiding power of love remains.

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based on tr

The Tattoist of Auschwitz

by Heather Morris

This beautiful, illuminating tale of hope and courage is based on interviews that were conducted with Holocaust survivor and Auschwitz-Birkenau tattooist Ludwig (Lale) Sokolov—an unforgettable love story in the midst of atrocity.

In April 1942, Lale Sokolov, a Slovakian Jew, is forcibly transported to the concentration camps at Auschwitz-Birkenau. When his captors discover that he speaks several languages, he is put to work as a Tätowierer (the German word for tattooist), tasked with permanently marking his fellow prisoners. One day he comforts a trembling young woman waiting in line to have the number 34902 tattooed onto her arm. Her name is Gita, and in that first encounter, Lale vows to somehow survive the camp and marry her.

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